School-Safe Puzzle Games

2 becomes 4

Ok, Here’s the 2nd challenge:

By drawing one line, can you separate the Yin/Yang into 4 sections of equal shape and size? (ignore the 2 eyes/spots)

Put 3 items up at once late Sunday night, so some of you may have missed the grasshoppers, and a neat word riddle.  Also, Roly poly cannon now loads quicker with mochi ads disabled, thank you Johnny-K!

Will put up another good puzzle game Wednesday morning.

16 Comments to “2 becomes 4”


  1. Obiwan | Profile

    S-shaped line (identical to line drawn along curve where black and white meet) rotated 90 degrees to the existing S shape. This yields four curved rain drop or tear-shaped figures–two white and two black.


  2. bilbao | Profile

    I get the 4 sections by drawing a new line of the shape of the border between yin and yang, and rotated 90 degrees clockwise


  3. hex | PUZZLE MASTER | Profile

    The trick here is that the line is not straight. A copy of the curved line splitting the Yin/Yang should be rotated 90 degrees and superimposed.


  4. bizarette18 | PUZZLE MASTER | Profile

    Another reverse S, a quarter turn round


  5. joe | Profile

    I cant draw it but if you imagine the already drawn line ( like an “S” the wrong way round), and draw an equal one rotated 90 degrees it will produce 4 equal segments.


  6. aaronlau | Profile

    This is an easy qn.
    Draw the same sinusoidal (vertical) line horizontally.
    something like imagine rotating it 90 degrees.


    Think you will only get stuck if u think of only straight lines.


  7. brianu | Profile

    copy the middle curve (double curve) and rotate it 90 degrees.


  8. Ari | Profile

    Here we go: http://arikemppainen.com/misc/yin-yang2.jpg
    You can divide the yin/yang with (drum roll) another ying/yang.


    Also here is my approach to the previous yin/yang puzzle, did not have the time to post this before the answers were unmasked: http://arikemppainen.com/misc/yin-yang.jpg
    As you can conduct from the image, the relationship between the circles is sqrt(2), which means the areas we were interested in the puzzle are equal.


  9. suineg | PUZZLE MASTER | Profile

    cool, I think you draw a symmetrical line exactly like the one that originally divides the ying and yang, but horizontally, you get like a curve X in the circle or a wicked swastica( creepy) jajajaja, but what about the color, this solution dont manage the color part jajaja however it says of equal size and shape, cool


  10. alexc | Profile

    Assuming the line doesn’t have to be straight,
    Rotating a copy of the line that forms boundry of the white and black sections by 90 degrees you get 4 smaller tear drop shaped sections of equal size and area.


  11. Falwan | Profile

    one vertical line going thru the center.


    we have 2 parts on the left and 2 parts on the right each stuck to together.


  12. Falwan | Profile

    one vertical line going thru the center.


    we have 2 parts on the left and 2 parts on the right each stuck together.


  13. Jimmy Anders | PUZZLE MASTER | Profile

    Does it have to be a straight line?


    If not, then rotate the cuved line that separates it in 2 already by 90 degrees about the center, and the two curved lines together separate the circle into 4 equal basically tear-dropped shapes.


  14. Shawn | PUZZLE GRANDMASTER | Profile

    Not one straight line, but certainly with one curved line. Starting at slightly higher than the 9 o’clock position, draw an arc (in the upper left quadrant) of the same radius as the semi-circle that surrounds the dot in the yin. Continue the line through the center point of the symbol, and draw the mirror image in the lower right quadrant.


    The line you draw will resemble a sine wave.


  15. fuzzy | Profile

    Yes. The line will be the same S-shape as the one that’s already on the yin-yang, and it will be at a 90-degree angle to the existing one, so to speak.


  16. RK | Founder | Profile

    A little bit tricky, but quite a few got this right. Lines don’t always have to be straight


    Ari’s 2nd diagram will be very helpful for solving the final, 3rd challenge (just posted).


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